In Imeachtaí By Victoria

Lá Columbus (Columbus Day): stair na féile

Ar an dara Luan de Dheireadh Fómhair na Stát Aontaithe a cheiliúradh Lá Columbus Columbus Day An cóimheas don saoire a bhí an débhríoch: mar shiombail ar an scaipeadh na sibhialtachta an Iarthair, tá an daonra dúchasach de Cholóim bheith in áit ina harbinger de an scrios a n-domhan. Is ar an gcúis go bhfuil Lá Columbus ar shráideanna na Stát Aontaithe ní amháin ar an pharáid, ach an léiriú ina chanted slogans rannpháirtithe go raibh Columbus dúnmharfóir. Ní gá trí stát SAM de Hawaii, Alasca agus Dakota Theas, aithníonn an saoire. I South Dakota, an dara Luan i mí Dheireadh Fómhair — Lá na Meiriceánaigh Dhúchasacha Native American Day


Cibé rud a bhí sé, tar éis éirí Columbus figiúr legendary. Ag dul sa tóir ar an bealach is giorra go dtí an India, d’oscail sé an bealach do sibhialtacht an Iarthair ar an Domhan Nua agus bealaí trádála nua, rud a athrú ar an léarscáil polaitiúil an domhain. A thabhairt duit an cainéal físeán “ History ” , ina mbainfidh tú teacht ar eolas gairid faoi stair an Lae Columbus sna Stáit Aontaithe agus an turas chun na hIndia a chríochnaigh le hoscailt talún nua.

Italians have long celebrated Christopher Columbus in tribute to their shared heritage. In 1937 President Roosevelt proclaimed October, 12 as Columbus Day. And in 1971 President Nixon declared Columbus Day a national holiday to be observed on a second Monday of October. [Thank you]. And why? Because Columbus discovered America and proved that the Earth was round except that’s not quite really happened which is into saving or have planning the thankings. Let’s take a look at Christopher Columbus, the man behind the myth, behind the holiday.

We all know how it started. On August 3rd 1492 Columbus and his three ships, the Ni We all know how it started. On August 3rd 1492 Columbus and his three ships, the Ni ñ a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. uair amháin i do gach duine. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a bhí bhabhta, ní raibh sé gá a. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. sféar chomh luath leis an 6ú haois RC agus Arastatail tacaíocht air suas dhá chéad bliain ina dhiaidh sin nuair fógraí bhféadfadh sé scáth an Domhain a bheith le feiceáil le linn eclipse lunary sleamhnáin thar an Ghealach i miniature agus bhí sé bhabhta. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. tolg ar chor ar bith? a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a fháil mear saibhir. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. dTurcach, chaill an Eoraip a bealach is coitianta chun na seoda an Oirthir. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a bhreacadh bealach an iarthair chun na hÁise agus taitneamh a bhaint ghlóir nach bhfacthas riamh roimhe agus riches. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. bhí chreid sé gearr go leor chun a choinneáil air agus a chuid fear ó fáil bháis den ocras agus tart. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. impireacht aontaithe a rolladh an dísle ar an mbealach Columbus ar. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. longa cáiliúil ualaithe le súil a aimsiú a mbealach chun na hÁise agus ag déanamh an Spáinn agus iad féin araon heck go leor airgid. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a bhí an domhan cairte taobh thiar dóibh. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. léarscáileanna, ach ní raibh sé amach go raibh a chúrsa breactha féin chun na hÁise gearr ag beagnach a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. leagan Iarthar Indias todhchaí) beagnach go díreach i gcás ina chreid sé an India a bheith. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. a shuíomh ina dtír Columbus dtús, ach bhí sé cinnte gur mhaith rinne sé é go dtí an India agus a dhearbhú an successfull bhealaigh. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. daoine dúchasacha a raibh cónaí a ann ar feadh na gcéadta bliain. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. is fíor ach amháin ó thaobh na hEorpa. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. go raibh an ceart nuair a mhaith súil aige a bheith — i dtalamh coimhthíocha iomlán de natives agus spíosraí. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. agus bhí sé cinnte, ach ní mar a bhí súil acu. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. an dá leathsféar. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. phláinéid agus trádáil idir na mór-ranna a bhunú. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing. theipeann ar Navigator Christopher Columbus a chaill an marc agus rinne sé ach an rud. a, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, set out from Spain and embarked on a historic journey. True, but let’s settle the “ why ” once in for all. Columbus wasn’t trying to prove the Earth was round, he didn’t need to. Greek mathematician Pythagoras suspected we were living on a sphere as early as the 6th century BC and Aristotle backed him up two centuries later when he notices the Earth’s shadow could be seen during a lunary eclipse sliding past the Moon in miniature and it was round. So why did Columbus bothered getting off the couch at all? Money. In the 15th century spices were hot commodity. Traders shipping them between Asia and Europe could get rich quick. However with the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, Europe lost its most popular route to the treasures of the East. Columbus realised his opportunity become the first person to plot a western route to Asia and enjoy unprecedented glory and riches. Inconsistent maps made calculating routes difficult. Columbus finally charted the south-western course he believed was short enough to keep him and his men from dying of starvation and thirst. Spain’s queen Isabella eager to expand her empire agreed to roll the dice on Columbus’s route. So on that August morning in 1492 Columbus and his men sailed off in those famous ships laden with hopes of finding their way to Asia and making both Spain and themselves a heck a lot of money. After a pit stop in the Canary Islands the charted world was behind them. Columbus had been right not to trust existing maps, but he didn’t realised that his own plotted course to Asia was short by nearly 10 000 miles. Luckily, a seria of islands (the future West Indias) lay almost exactly where he believed India to be. And the relieved sailors made land fall. This is where things get tricky. We’re still not sure of the exact location where Columbus first landed, but he was convinced he’d made it to India and declared the route successfull. Mission accomplished. The Indians who greeted him were actually an indigenous people who had lived there for centuries. So the claim that Columbus discovered the Americas is only true from a European perspective. But as far as Columbus was concerned he was right where he’d expected to be – in an exotic land full of natives and spices. Columbus returned to the Spanish court a hero. All were convinced the route was a success and it surely was, but not as they had expected. Columbus inadvertently achieved the monumental task of joining the two hemispheres. In effect doubling the size of a habitable planet and establishing trade between the continents. So on Columbus Day raise a glass to fail of a navigator Christopher Columbus who missed the mark and did it just the thing.

Useful words and phrases:

  • Tribute, n — ómós.

An focal holiday tar san ábhar seo in úsáid trí briathra: to proclaim to declare to observe

  • Proclaim, v — a fhógairt, a dhearbhú.
  • Declare, v — dhearbhú dhearbhú.
  • Observe, v — a cheiliúradh, a cheiliúradh.
  • Set out (from), v — gabháil le tosú ar thuras.
  • Embark on, v — tús a chur ar.
  • Settle, v — deireadh a chur le (difríochtaí).
  • Back up, v — tacaíocht (eg an dearcadh.).
  • For all — cé, is cuma cén.
  • Lunary eclipse — eclipse gealaí.
  • Hot commodity — méadú ar an éileamh earraí (earraí san éileamh).
  • Inconsistent, adj — neamhréireach agus salach.
  • Chart (a course), v — chun léarscáil (an bealach).
  • Die of (starvation, thirst), v — bás ó (ocras, tart).
  • Plat the route, v — a phleanáil, meastachán, chun ríomhanna a sheoladh; sceitseáil amach an scéim, an phlean; dhéanamh (léarscáil, agus mar sin meastachán. n.).
  • Roll the dice, v — rolla an dísle.
  • Be laden with — a chur i gcrích (brón súil,).
  • Pit stop, n — stad, stop.
  • Mission accomplished — misean i gcrích.
  • Indigenous, adj — aboriginal, dúchasach, ó dhúchas.
  • Inadvertently, adv — thaisme, neamhdheonach, gan chuimhneamh, go neamhdheonach, gan chuimhneamh (gníomhartha agus gníomhais).
  • Habitable, adj — ináitrithe.
  • Raise a glass to, v — toast a …
  • Miss the mark, v — bhuail leathan ar an sprioc, gan a bhaint amach nach bhfuil (a) cuspóir a bhaint amach a gcuid féin, go mainneoidh; ≈ a rinneadh go randamach.
  • Just the thing — ach an méid is gá duit.

Agus anois a chuirimid ar fáil duit a dhéanamh ar thástáil gearr ar erudition agus tuiscint ar an ábhar seo.

 

Imeachtaí

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>